Tag Archives: home intervention

Sibling Behavior Chart

This positive behavior chart is intended for siblings to use to work together! 

When I searched, I couldn’t find a sibling chart online so I decided to create one. The research supports siblings working together on one chart! See research link at the bottom of this post…

TPT link: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Sibling-Positive-Behavior-Chart-4885639

“Work together to get the LEGO character to the house!”

Here is a picture of my son’s chart (modified for one child)

How to set up the board:

  1. Print out both pages on card stock (colored or white).
  2. Laminate both pages
  3. Put Velcro on each square and one on the mini LEGO house
  4. Find your children’s favorite LEGO character and put Velcro on their back 
  5. Hole punch and put two O-Rings to connect the pages together to make the chart fold up. Use a binder clip to keep the chart closed and to hang it up in the house
  6. Use wet erase marker to set family rules and write in rewards
Set your family rules! State in positive terms and use a wet erase marker.

How to use the board:

  • Create three positively stated family rules “We keep our hands to ourselves”
  • Teach, model and practice the rules as a family
  • Pre-determine what each child would like to “earn” as a reward once the LEGO character gets to the house
  • Parents “catch” both children following one or more rules and advance the LEGO character one spot
  • Be explicit on why you are moving the LEGO character. For example say “I caught you both keeping your hands to yourself so we can move the LEGO character. Only seven more and you get to the house. Keep up the great work.”
  • Once the children get to the house, they get the reward and you can start over if you want. Make sure to check in and see what they want to work for as a reinforcer  

Helpful Hints:

  • When creating rules use positive language
  • Give a forced choice of two-three rewards to make sure the rewards are doable for you and the family
  • These rewards should not necessarily be huge items to work for. Small and consumable items may be a good start
  • Make sure any reward you are using is not accessible during other times of the day. 
  • Remember, a reward is only considered a reinforce if it increases the desired behavior
  • If you can’t find something reinforcing, continue to do reinforcement assessments until you find the right motivator
  • Don’t move the character backwards. If the child doesn’t earn it, just don’t advance the character. 
  • Encourage “buy-in” by having the children earn the reward quickly at first. 

Here is the research link if you are interested https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/anzf.1183

Set Up An Independent Work System At Home For Your Child With Autism

Benefits of independent work systems:  

Independent work systems are evidence-based practice for students with autism, but they are very helpful for any child who needs some structure to be able to work on his or her own.

Most children benefit from structure in their environment

My son who started Kindergarten, now has homework so I set up a structured work system so he has somewhere in the house dedicated to completing his homework.

  • Special education classrooms use a variation of these work systems and supports to help teach independence and provide structure.

♥ I want to share this technique and show how easy this independent work system is to create and use at home. Even if you don’t work with an autism specialist or have in-home Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapist, this is something you can create with a quick trip to the dollar store and moving around some furniture. Continue reading